Apple’s iBooks, iTunes Movies mysteriously suspended in China; customers want refunds


Apple

Apple has not issued any statement to customers in China about the status of the services, but many users report that they have been unable to connect to the movie service and iBooks since April 15.

A Beijing-based Apple spokeswoman said: “We hope to make books and movies available again to our customers in China as soon as possible,” but she would not elaborate on why the services were unavailable.

The Chinese government has not issued any statement on the matter. However, the New York Times, citing two anonymous sources, said the State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television had ordered the services offline, though it was unclear why.

Apple’s App Store revenue has surged in China in the last year, overtaking Japan as the world’s No. 2 market for the service, according to App Annie.

Apple technical assistance and account service representatives, reached by phone in China, said they had received no official notice from the company that the services had been blocked or shut down. They offered to arrange refunds on purchased content.

http://www.latimes.com/world/asia/la-fg-china-apple-ibook-itunes-movies-20160422-story.html

APPLE’S IBOOKS, ITUNES MOVIES MYSTERIOUSLY SUSPENDED IN CHINA; CUSTOMERS WANT REFUNDS


chinese-ipad35

Apple has not issued any statement to customers in China about the status of the services, but many users report that they have been unable to connect to the movie service and iBooks since April 15.

A Beijing-based Apple spokeswoman said: “We hope to make books and movies available again to our customers in China as soon as possible,” but she would not elaborate on why the services were unavailable.

The Chinese government has not issued any statement on the matter. However, the New York Times, citing two anonymous sources, said the State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television had ordered the services offline, though it was unclear why.

http://www.infowars.com/apples-ibooks-itunes-movies-mysteriously-suspended-in-china-customers-want-refunds/

 

FBI facing demands to share its claimed technique to unlock iPhones


5312

Any day now, Hillar Moore is expecting a call from the FBI.

Moore, a district attorney in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has publicly lamented that Apple’s iPhone encryption is keeping local police out of a victim’s phone in  a recent murder. On Monday, Moore’s ears perked up when the FBI announced it would drop its court battle with Apple after it figured out a way to pull data from the iPhone of Syed Farook, the San Bernardino gunman.

Moore, like many others, wants in.

“Waiting on them to call me,” he wrote in an email exchange with the Guardian, “to see if they can assist in getting into my phone.”

The FBI now faces a series of tough questions after it announced to the world that it has a technique for hacking into Farook’s iPhone – something Apple says shouldn’t be possible on current models without a user’s passcode. Naturally, a lot of other people – from local police to parents – say they could benefit from the technology.

The technique is a closely guarded secret at FBI headquarters. It probably relies on a security flaw in Apple’s mobile operating system. Because of that, the bureau realizes that the more widely it’s shared, the more likely Apple could learn about the technique and patch it.

Such a calculus can be hard to fathom for people who just want access to a locked iPhone. A father in Italy is asking Apple to unlock his dead son’s phone – so he can reminisce through his son’s stored pictures – or he will try to find whatever tool the FBI used. On Wednesday, a local prosecutor in Arkansas told the Associated Press that the bureau had agreed to share its technique with him in a murder case involving an iPhone and an iPod.

http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2016/apr/01/fbi-apple-iphone-unlock-encryption-san-bernardino

LAW ENFORCEMENT DEMANDS FBI SHARE IPHONE HACK TECHNIQUE


apple-iphone

Moore, a district attorney in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has publicly lamented that Apple’s iPhone encryption is keeping local police out of a victim’s phone in a recent murder. On Monday, Moore’s ears perked up when the FBI announced it would drop its court battle with Apple after it figured out a way to pull data from the iPhone of Syed Farook, the San Bernardino gunman.

http://www.infowars.com/law-enforcement-demands-fbi-share-iphone-hack-technique/

 

 

FBI: ATTACKER’S PHONE POSSIBLY ACCESSIBLE WITHOUT APPLE HELP


iphone3

In a stunning reversal on Monday, federal prosecutors asked a judge to halt a much-anticipated hearing on their efforts to force Apple to unlock the phone. The FBI may have found another way, and Apple’s cooperation may no longer be needed, according to court papers filed late Monday, less than 24 hours before Tuesday’s hearing.

“An outside party” came forward over the weekend and showed the FBI a possible method to access the data on Syed Rizwan Farook’s encrypted phone, according to the filing.

http://www.infowars.com/fbi-attackers-phone-possibly-accessible-without-apple-help/

Apple unveils smaller iPhone SE; Cook defends privacy stance


Apple Vice President Greg Joswiak introduces the iPhone SE during an event at the Apple headquarters in Cupertino, California

Apple Inc (AAPL.O) on Monday unveiled a smaller, cheaper iPhone aimed at emerging markets and possibly China, the world’s biggest buyer of smartphones, as the technology company looks to reverse a decline in worldwide sales of its most important product.

The new device, called the iPhone SE, has a 4-inch (10-cm) screen and represents Apple’s second bid for the crowded mid-tier market after an unsuccessful foray three years ago.

The more compact phone design comes after its expanded the size of the screens in its high-end iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus phones in 2014 to as large as 5.5 inches. That was broadly seen as an attempt to match rival Samsung Electronics (005930.KS) with its large-screen Galaxy phones.

Before the launch at Apple’s leafy Cupertino, California headquarters, Chief Executive Tim Cook defended the company’s refusal to comply with a U.S. court order to unlock an iPhone belonging to one of the shooters in a December attack in San Bernardino, California.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-apple-products-idUSKCN0WN0HA

Apple ‘privacy czars’ grapple with internal conflicts over user data


File picture shows Apple Vice President of Software Technology Tribble delivering testimony during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Washington

As Apple Inc(AAPL.O) feuds with the U.S. government over iPhone privacy protections, the tech giant is also grappling with internal conflicts over privacy that could pose challenges to its long-term product strategy.

Unlike Google(GOOGL.O), Amazon(AMZN.O) and Facebook(FB.O), Apple is loathe to use customer data to deliver targeted advertising or personalized recommendations. Indeed, any collection of Apple customer data requires sign-off from a committee of three “privacy czars” and a top executive, according to four former employees who worked on a variety of products that went through privacy vetting.

Approval is anything but automatic: products including the Siri voice-command feature and the recently scaled-back iAd advertising network were restricted over privacy concerns, these people said.

Many employees take pride in Apple’s stance, and CEO Tim Cook has called it a matter of principle.

“Customers expect Apple and other technology companies to do everything in our power to protect their personal information,” Cook wrote in a letter explaining the company’s opposition to a government demand that it help unlock the iPhone of one of the shooters in the December attacks in San Bernardino, California.

Such policies also have a business rationale: Apple’s apparent willingness to sacrifice some profit for the sake of privacy bolsters its image as a company that protects customers.

It’s an easier stand for Apple to take than, say, Facebook or Amazon – Apple’s chief business to date has been selling devices rather than advertising or e-commerce.

But now, amid stagnant iPhone sales, Apple executives have flagged services such as iCloud and Apple Music as prime sources for growth – which could test the company’s commitment to limiting the use of personal data.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-apple-encryption-privacy-insight-idUSKCN0WN0BO