China Responds to U.S. Election With Heavy Censorship, Light Schadenfreude


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The reaction among the United States’ strongest allies in Asia — Japan and South Korea — was more severe, however, as local stock markets plunged.

As news of Donald Trump’s shocking presidential win was reverberating around the world Wednesday, media coverage in China was oddly scant — and not by accident.

China’s censors had issued advance orders to media outlets to restrict coverage of the U.S. democratic contest. All websites, news outlets and TV networks were told not to provide any live coverage or broadcasts of the election and to avoid “excessive” reporting of the story, a source who was briefed on the official instructions told the South China Morning Post.

In response, coverage of Trump’s upset was carried only as a secondary story across the Chinese media landscape, with most outlets highlighting a meeting between Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and Vladimir Putin instead.

China’s foreign ministry also stopped short of issuing congratulations to Trump in the immediate aftermath of the decision, instead stating: “China is closely following the U.S. presidential election, and expects to maintain healthy Sino-U.S. relations with the new government.” (Chinese President Xi Jinping was also making calls elsewhere: he rang outer space to congratulate the astronauts aboard China’s recently launched Shenzhou 11 spacecraft, wishing them “a victorious return.”)

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/china-responds-us-election-heavy-censorship-light-schadenfreude-945674

Japan’s Next Generation of Farmers Could Be Robots


As the average age of farmers globally creeps higher and retirement looms, Japan has a solution: robots and driver-less tractors.

The Group-of-Seven agriculture ministers meet in Japan’s northern prefecture of Niigata this weekend for the first time in seven years to discuss how to meet increasing food demand as aging farmers retire without successors. With the average age of Japanese farmers now 67, Agriculture Minister Hiroshi Moriyama will outline his idea of replacing retiring growers with Japanese-developed autonomous tractors and backpack-carried robots.

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has warned that left unchecked, aging farmers could threaten the ability to produce the food the world needs. The average age of growers in developed countries is now about 60, according to the United Nations. Japan plans to spend 4 billion yen ($36 million) in the year through March to promote farm automation and help develop 20 different types of robots, including one that separates over-ripe peaches when harvesting.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-04-23/robots-replacing-japan-s-farmers-seen-preserving-food-security

JAPAN’S NEXT GENERATION OF FARMERS COULD BE ROBOTS


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The Group-of-Seven agriculture ministers meet in Japan’s northern prefecture of Niigata this weekend for the first time in seven years to discuss how to meet increasing food demand as aging farmers retire without successors. With the average age of Japanese farmers now 67, Agriculture Minister Hiroshi Moriyama will outline his idea of replacing retiring growers with Japanese-developed autonomous tractors and backpack-carried robots.

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has warned that left unchecked, aging farmers could threaten the ability to produce the food the world needs. The average age of growers in developed countries is now about 60, according to the United Nations. Japan plans to spend 4 billion yen ($36 million) in the year through March to promote farm automation and help develop 20 different types of robots, including one that separates over-ripe peaches when harvesting.

http://www.infowars.com/japans-next-generation-of-farmers-could-be-robots/

 

Japan to Release Radioactive Water from Fukushima into the Sea


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At the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan, scientists are running out of space for the plant’s enormous amounts of irradiated water. The radioactive water is being stored in thousands of tanks, and contains tritium, a substance that is hazardous to health. About 300 tons need to be pumped into the plant every day to keep its reactors cool.

Tritium can be removed from water in laboratories, but such an effort would be preposterously expensive, so scientists have another idea in mind: dumping the nuclear waste into the ocean.

The scientists say the risks are minimal, but many Japanese residents are understandably frightened and upset. The nation’s fishermen staunchly oppose the plan, fearing a release of the water could devastate local fish stocks. [1]

More important than the fish supply is the potential toll a release of tritium could have on human health. The substance goes directly into the soft tissues and organs of the body, potentially increasing the risk of cancer and other illnesses.

The Japanese government has been trying to downplay the risk to the public. Japan’s Parliamentary Secretary even sipped from a glass of decontaminated water taken from puddles inside the buildings housing reactors 5 and 6 in front of news cameras.

http://naturalsociety.com/radioactive-water-fukushima-dumped-in-sea-7261/

 

JAPAN TO RELEASE RADIOACTIVE WATER FROM FUKUSHIMA INTO THE SEA


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Tritium can be removed from water in laboratories, but such an effort would be preposterously expensive, so scientists have another idea in mind: dumping the nuclear waste into the ocean.

The scientists say the risks are minimal, but many Japanese residents are understandably frightened and upset. The nation’s fishermen staunchly oppose the plan, fearing a release of the water could devastate local fish stocks. [1]

More important than the fish supply is the potential toll a release of tritium could have on human health. The substance goes directly into the soft tissues and organs of the body, potentially increasing the risk of cancer and other illnesses.

http://www.infowars.com/japan-to-release-radioactive-water-from-fukushima-into-the-sea/

The 2016 All-Japan Research Team: The No. 1 Analysts


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The winning streaks continue. Two analysts have spent more than a decade atop their respective sector rosters on Institutional Investor’s All-Japan Research Team: Nobuyuki Saji of Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities Co., now in his 15th year in first place in Economics, and UBS’s Atsushi Yamaguchi, who celebrates his 14th year at No. 1 in Metals.

Toshiya Mizutani, also of Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley, captures his tenth straight victory in Construction and thus earns entry into the All-Japan Research Team Hall of Fame.

These three are among the 24 winners who led their lineups in 2015 too. Four advance from second place, one jumps from third and another vaults from runner-up.

Three of these top-ranked researchers are visiting the winner’s circle for the first time: Ryota Himeno of Barclays (Transportation), and Nomura’s Ken Takamiya (Banks) and Daisuke Fukushima (Housing & Real Estate).

Listed below by sector are this year’s top-ranked analysts. Click on an individual’s name to view his or her profile. Please note: Free site registration will be requested of anyone who hasn’t already signed up.

http://www.institutionalinvestor.com/article/3542494/research-and-rankings/the-2016-all-japan-research-team-the-no-1-analysts.html#.VwVWn6QrLIU

Japan’s lawyers have an odd problem: not enough lawsuits


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Japan is struggling with an unlikely problem: Its people aren’t litigious enough.

Fifteen years ago, the nation kicked off a plan to double the number of lawyers. Officials thought they could breathe dynamism into society by mimicking the Western legal system, where courts are more involved in settling issues such as consumer safety and corporate malfeasance.

But Japan’s new lawyers have failed to make a winning argument for why they are needed. The number of regular civil cases filed each year hasn’t budged in a decade. With crime near a record low and bankruptcies plunging, many lawyers are pleading relative poverty.