World media look to green future without US


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Frustration with the US is flowing freely in global media following President Donald Trump’s announcement that his country would withdraw from the Paris climate agreement signed in 2015 by 195 countries.

European newspapers see an opportunity to move forward without the burden of appeasing a reluctant partner in Washington.

And in China, state-run media see their country ascending to a position of global leadership on the issue of climate change.

The announcement also triggered a global conversation on social media, with climate-related hashtags trending worldwide.

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Europe

Newspapers on the continent generally expressed disappointment at the decision, but saw in it an opportunity for Europe to forge a new path.

French centre-left daily Le Monde said that the decision had “widened the gap of mistrust” and noted that Mr Trump’s mantra of “America First” seems to be leading the country to ever greater isolation.

Similarly, the French financial newspaper Les Echos says America is now part of a “trio of marginalised” nations, along with Syria and Nicaragua, who are not part of the deal. It adds that the move has not “signed the death warrant” of the agreement.

France’s left-wing Libération newspaper took a more personal view of the Mr Trump, saying: “Since his accession to the White House, the US president has believed he is on a reality show. Except for the fact that this is no longer a game, it is about the future of the planet.”

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A commentary in Germany’s centre-right Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung sees a certain “cold logic” in Mr Trump’s move, in that he appears to prefer to deal with migration with “walls and weapons” rather than action to limit global warming.

“[The US] is reducing its financial contribution to global climate protection while boosting funding for the military and homeland security,” writes its Washington correspondent, Winand von Petersdorff.

Trump ‘shakes global community’

Germany’s conservative Die Welt sees something positive in Trump’s decision, saying it will actually be good for the Paris agreement to lose countries who do not believe in it.

“Those whose take part half-heartedly or even dishonestly are likely to undermine its agenda from the inside,” says a commentary by the paper’s science editor, Norbert Lossau.

A presenter on Russia’s state-controlled Channel One TV said that Mr Trump has “shaken the global community once again”.

And state-owned newspaper Rossiyskaya Gazeta was more sympathetic to Mr Trump than most, saying he had “stood up against Americans paying for the USA’s ‘climatic leadership’, getting nothing in return, except for sweet-voiced chants of European politicians”.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-40130447

Trump climate agreement: Rest of world rallies around Paris deal


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China, the EU and India, which along with the US make up the four biggest emitters of carbon dioxide, have restated their commitment to the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change.

Top EU official Donald Tusk said at a summit with China that Brussels and Beijing would step up co-operation.

Mr Trump announced the US was leaving for economic reasons, saying the deal would cost American jobs.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said the US would still curb emissions.

Amid widespread international condemnation of the US decision, Russian President Vladimir Putin said he would “not judge” Mr Trump.

The Paris agreement commits the US and 194 other countries to keeping rising global temperatures “well below” 2C above pre-industrial levels and “endeavour to limit” them even more, to 1.5C.

The UN World Meteorological Organisation said on Friday that, in the worst scenario, the US pullout could add 0.3C to global temperatures by the end of the century.

What do the EU and China say?

European Council President Donald Tusk said after meeting Chinese Premier Li Keqiang that the two powers took their responsibilities seriously.

“Today, China and Europe have demonstrated solidarity with future generations and responsibility for the whole planet,” he told reporters at a joint news conference.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-40136908

France’s Emmanuel Macron: Birth of the anti-Trump?


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Emmanuel Macron has just won the rare distinction of being the most re-tweeted French person in history.

In less than 24 hours, his Trump-defying message “make our planet great again” was shared more than 140,000 times, easily ousting the previous record-holder, the rather less high-minded TV presenter Cyril Hanouna. One fifth of the re-tweets were in the US.

It is proof yet again that what we witnessed from the Elysee on Thursday was a master class in communications.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-40140113

Does Trump still think climate change is a hoax


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For a speech about whether the US should remain a party to the Paris climate accord, Donald Trump’s Rose Garden address on Thursday didn’t have a whole lot of discussion about, you know, the climate.

There was plenty of talk about jobs and the US economy. He offered more than a few expressions of concern over whether other nations were being given an unfair advantage over the US. And then there was that lengthy opening plug for his presidential accomplishments that had nothing to do with the environment whatsoever.

At one point the president made a somewhat oblique reference to current climate science, asserting that even if all nations hit their self-set, non-mandatory greenhouse gas emissions targets under the Paris agreement, it would only result in a 0.2% reduction in average global temperatures by the year 2100. (The researchers who conducted the study said the number he cited was outdated and misrepresented.)

Mr Trump’s relative silence on the matter has left reporters wondering whether the president still stands by earlier comments – and tweets – expressing serious scepticism about the whether climate change is real.

Does he still believe it’s a Chinese plot to make the US less competitive, as he tweeted in November 2012? Or that it is a money-making “hoax”, as he said during a December 2015 campaign rally?”‘

He’s occasionally backed away from such sweeping denunciations. During the first presidential debate with Hillary Clinton, he denied having ever blamed the Chinese. In a New York Times interview shortly after his election victory, he said he thinks there’s “some connectivity” between human activity and climate change.

After Mr Trump announced his Paris agreement withdrawal, reporters posed the almost-too-obvious question once again to White House aides tasked with selling the move to the public. Does the president believe human activity contributes to climate change?

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-40128034

 

 

Resorts World Manila: At least 36 bodies found at casino complex


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Most of the dead suffocated in thick toxic smoke after the man set fire to casino tables, officials told the BBC.

The gunman, whose nationality is not yet known, began shooting in the casino in Resorts World Manila in the early hours of Friday morning.

Police said he later killed himself by setting himself on fire.

Authorities initially said there were no casualties, but appear to have only found the bodies while sweeping the complex after the gunman’s body was recovered.

Manchester attack: Police not sharing information with US


 

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UK officials were outraged when photos appearing to show debris from the attack appeared in the New York Times.

It came after the name of bomber Salman Abedi was leaked to US media just hours after the attack, which left 22 dead.

Theresa May said she would tell Donald Trump at a Nato meeting that shared intelligence “must remain secure”.

The US’s acting ambassador to the UK “unequivocally condemned” the leaks in a BBC radio interview.

“These leaks were reprehensible, deeply distressing,” Lewis Lukens said.

“We have had communications at the highest level of our government … we are determined to identify these leaks and to stop them.”

Meanwhile, the Queen has been to the Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital visiting some of the injured as well as members of the emergency services.

While there she paid tribute to Manchester and the “extraordinary” way the city had responded to Monday’s attack at an Ariana Grande concert, in which 116 people were also injured.

Families’ distress

In total eight men are now in custody following the bombing carried out by Manchester-born Abedi, a 22-year-old from a family of Libyan origin.

The arrests have been “significant” while searches of premises have also yielded items “important to the investigation”, Greater Manchester Police said.

It has also emerged two people who had known Abedi at college made separate calls to a hotline to warn the police about his extremist views.

A Whitehall source said Abedi was one of a “pool” of former subjects of interest whose risk remained “subject to review” by the security service and its partners.

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-40040210

Iran ‘conducts new ballistic missile tests’


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The Revolutionary Guards said in a statement that the tests demonstrated the country’s “deterrent power”.

US officials said that if the reports were confirmed, they would raise the matter at the UN Security Council.

In January, the US imposed sanctions targeting Iran’s missile programme in response to the last round of tests.

UN experts said those tests had violated a Security Council resolution.

Resolution 1929, which barred Iran from undertaking any work on ballistic missiles capable of carrying nuclear warheads, was terminated after a nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers was implemented two months ago. A new resolution, 2231, then came into force that “calls upon” Iran not to undertake such activity.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-35752974